Pets

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Disney Princess Palace Pets Collection 7 Palace Pets! Toy Haul Glitter Pets Plush Pets

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Disney Princess Palace Pets Collection 7 Palace Pets! Talking Pets Glitter Pets Plush Pets Hi Guys! Welcome to BubblePOP kids! In this video we open and review 7 Palace pets in this Toy haul! Enjoy!! Palace pets, 宫廷宠物, 宮殿ペット, 궁전 애완 동물, palacio mascotas, palácio animais de estimação, palais animaux, Palast Haustiere, महल पालतू जानवर, palazzo animali domestici, дворец домашние, палац домашні, pałac zwierzęta, قصر الحيوانات الأليفة, ארמון חיות מחמד. Each Palace Pet has been found and adopted by th...

Disney Princess Palace Pets Collection 7 Palace Pets! Toy Haul Glitter Pets Plush Pets

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Disney Princess Palace Pets Collection 7 Palace Pets! Talking Pets Glitter Pets Plush Pets Hi Guys! Welcome to BubblePOP kids! In this video we open and review 7 Palace pets in this Toy haul! Enjoy!! Palace pets, 宫廷宠物, 宮殿ペット, 궁전 애완 동물, palacio mascotas, palácio animais de estimação, palais animaux, Palast Haustiere, महल पालतू जानवर, palazzo animali domestici, дворец домашние, палац домашні, pałac zwierzęta, قصر الحيوانات الأليفة, ארמון חיות מחמד. Each Palace Pet has been found and adopted by th...

Disney Princess Palace Pets Collection 7 Palace Pets! Toy Haul Glitter Pets Plush Pets

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Disney Princess Palace Pets Collection 7 Palace Pets! Talking Pets Glitter Pets Plush Pets Hi Guys! Welcome to BubblePOP kids! In this video we open and review 7 Palace pets in this Toy haul! Enjoy!! Palace pets, 宫廷宠物, 宮殿ペット, 궁전 애완 동물, palacio mascotas, palácio animais de estimação, palais animaux, Palast Haustiere, महल पालतू जानवर, palazzo animali domestici, дворец домашние, палац домашні, pałac zwierzęta, قصر الحيوانات الأليفة, ארמון חיות מחמד. Each Palace Pet has been found and adopted by th...

Palace Pets Toys | Princess Pets | Palace Pets Pumpkin | Palace Pets Plush | My Busy Books

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Weve got Palace Pets toys in this 3-in-1 playset—My Busy Books, Palace Pets. The Disney activity book comes with a Palace Pets story with Disney princesses, 12 Disney figurines & a princess castle play mat.

Disney Princess Palace Pets Collection 7 Palace Pets! Toy Haul Glitter Pets Plush Pets

https://www.dailymotion.com/video/x58776k
Disney Princess Palace Pets Collection 7 Palace Pets! Talking Pets Glitter Pets Plush Pets Hi Guys! Welcome to BubblePOP kids! In this video we open and review 7 Palace pets in this Toy haul! Enjoy!! Palace pets, 宫廷宠物, 宮殿ペット, 궁전 애완 동물, palacio mascotas, palácio animais de estimação, palais animaux, Palast Haustiere, महल पालतू जानवर, palazzo animali domestici, дворец домашние, палац домашні, pałac zwierzęta, قصر الحيوانات الأليفة, ארמון חיות מחמד. Each Palace Pet has been found and adopted by th...

Disney Princess Palace Pets Collection 7 Palace Pets! Toy Haul Glitter Pets Plush Pets

https://www.dailymotion.com/video/x55y69x
Disney Princess Palace Pets Collection 7 Palace Pets! Talking Pets Glitter Pets Plush Pets Hi Guys! Welcome to BubblePOP kids! In this video we open and review 7 Palace pets in this Toy haul! Enjoy!! Palace pets, 宫廷宠物, 宮殿ペット, 궁전 애완 동물, palacio mascotas, palácio animais de estimação, palais animaux, Palast Haustiere, महल पालतू जानवर, palazzo animali domestici, дворец домашние, палац домашні, pałac zwierzęta, قصر الحيوانات الأليفة, ארמון חיות מחמד. Each Palace Pet has been found and adopted by th...

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Disney Princess Palace Pets Collection 7 Palace Pets! Talking Pets Glitter Pets Plush Pets Hi Guys! Welcome to BubblePOP kids! In this video we open and

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[PDF] HOUSE PETS: BENEFITS, CAUTIONS, AND HOW TO CARE FOR YOUR HOUSE PETS (All Things Pets Book 1)

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[Doc] Signs From Pets In The Afterlife: Identifying Messages From Pets In Heaven

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Signs From Pets In The Afterlife: Identifying Messages From Pets In Heaven By : Lyn Ragan Click Here : https://welcomemycenel2.blogspot.com/?book=0991641426

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About For Books Signs From Pets In The Afterlife: Identifying Messages From Pets In Heaven

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https://best.specialrecommendations.space/?book=0991641426 Signs from beloved pets are seen by thousands every day. Some communications are received in ways that do require an acute awareness as well as more interpretation. From the Heavens above, Signs are shared by deceased pets to connect with their families they left behind. Many times, these gifts are unseen or are difficult to identify. Learning to speak the Language of Spirit requires practice but once identified, the joy of hearing from your Pet in...

Pet

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pet
A pet, or companion animal, is an animal kept primarily for a person's company, entertainment or as an act of compassion such as taking in and protecting a stray cat, rather than as a working animal, livestock or laboratory animal.

A tabby cat and a mixed Molosser dog

A pet, or companion animal, is an animal kept primarily for a person's company, entertainment or as an act of compassion such as taking in and protecting a stray cat, rather than as a working animal, livestock or laboratory animal. Popular pets are often considered to have attractive appearances, intelligence and relatable personalities, but some pets may be taken in on an altruistic basis and accepted as they are.

Two of the most popular pets are dogs and cats. The technical term for a cat lover is an ailurophile, and for a dog lover, a cynophile. Other animals commonly kept include: rabbits; ferrets; pigs; rodents, such as gerbils, hamsters, chinchillas, rats, and guinea pigs; avian pets, such as parrots, passerines and Fowls; reptile pets, such as turtles, alligators, crocodiles, lizards, and snakes; aquatic pets, such as fish, freshwater and saltwater snails, amphibians like frogs and salamanders; and arthropod pets, such as tarantulas and hermit crabs. Small pets may be grouped together as pocket pets, while the equine and bovine group include the largest companion animals.

Pets provide their owners (or "guardians")[1] both physical and emotional benefits. Walking a dog can provide both the human and the dog with exercise, fresh air and social interaction. Pets can give companionship to people who are living alone or elderly adults who do not have adequate social interaction with other people. There is a medically approved class of therapy animals, mostly dogs or cats, that are brought to visit confined humans, such as children in hospitals or elders in nursing homes. Pet therapy utilizes trained animals and handlers to achieve specific: physical, social, cognitive or emotional goals with patients.

People most commonly get pets for companionship, to protect a home or property or because of the beauty or attractiveness of the animals.[2] Aside from lack of desire, the most common reasons for not owning a pet are lack of time, lack of suitable housing and lack of ability to care for the pet when traveling.[2][3] Some scholars, ethicists and animal rights organizations have raised concerns over keeping pets because of the lack of autonomy and objectification of non-human animals.[4]

A Maine Coon kitten aged ten weeks

Pet popularity

China

In China, spending on domestic animals has grown from and estimated $3.12 billion in 2010 to $25 billion in 2018. The Chinese people own 51 million dogs and 41 million cats, with pet owners often preferring to source pet food internationally.[5] There are a total of 755 million pets, increased from 389 million in 2013.[6]

Italy

According to a survey promoted by Italian family associations in 2009, it is estimated that there are approximately 45 million pets in Italy. This includes 7 million dogs, 7.5 million cats, 16 million fish, 12 million birds, and 10 million snakes.[7]

United Kingdom

A 2007 survey by the University of Bristol found that 26% of UK households owned cats and 31% owned dogs, estimating total domestic populations of approximately 10.3 million cats and 10.5 million dogs in 2006.[8] The survey also found that 47.2% of households with a cat had at least one person educated to degree level, compared with 38.4% of homes with dogs.[9]

United States

Sixty-eight percent of U.S. households, or about 85 million families, own a pet, according to the 2017-2018 National Pet Owners Survey conducted by the American Pet Products Association (APPA). This is up from 56 percent of U.S. households in 1988, the first year the survey was conducted.[10]There are approximately 86.4 million pet cats and approximately 78.2 million pet dogs in the United States,[11][12] and a United States 2007–2008 survey showed that dog-owning households outnumbered those owning cats, but that the total number of pet cats was higher than that of dogs. The same was true for 2011.[13] In 2013, pets outnumbered children four to one in the United States.[14]

Most popular pets in the U.S (millions)[15][16]
Pet Global population U.S. population U.S. inhabited households U.S. average per inhabited household
Cat 202 93.6 38.2 2.45
Dog 171 77.5 45.6 1.70
Fish N/A 171.7 13.3 12.86
Small mammals N/A 15.9 5.3 3.00
Birds N/A 15.0 6.0 2.50
Reptiles & amphibians N/A 13.6 4.7 2.89
Equine N/A 13.3 3.9 3.41

Effects on pets' health

Keeping animals as pets may be detrimental to their health if certain requirements are not met. An important issue is inappropriate feeding, which may produce clinical effects. The consumption of chocolate or grapes by dogs, for example, may prove fatal.

Certain species of houseplants can also prove toxic if consumed by pets. Examples include philodendrons and Easter lilies (which can cause severe kidney damage to cats)[17][18] and poinsettias, begonia, and aloe vera (which are mildly toxic to dogs).[19][20]

Housepets, particularly dogs and cats in industrialized societies, are also highly susceptible to obesity. Overweight pets have been shown to be at a higher risk of developing diabetes, liver problems, joint pain, kidney failure, and cancer. Lack of exercise and high-caloric diets are considered to be the primary contributors to pet obesity.[21][22][23]

Effects of pets on their caregiver's health

Health benefits

It is widely believed among the public, and among many scientists, that pets probably bring mental and physical health benefits to their owners;[24] a 1987 NIH statement cautiously argued that existing data was "suggestive" of a significant benefit.[25] A recent dissent comes from a 2017 RAND study, which found that at least in the case of children, having a pet per se failed to improve physical or mental health by a statistically significant amount; instead, the study found children who were already prone to being healthy were more likely to get pets in the first place.[24][26][27] Unfortunately, conducting long-term randomized trials to settle the issue would be costly or infeasible.[25][27]

Observed correlations

Pets might have the ability to stimulate their caregivers, in particular the elderly, giving people someone to take care of, someone to exercise with, and someone to help them heal from a physically or psychologically troubled past.[25][28][29] Animal company can also help people to preserve acceptable levels of happiness despite the presence of mood symptoms like anxiety or depression.[30] Having a pet may also help people achieve health goals, such as lowered blood pressure, or mental goals, such as decreased stress.[31][32][33][34][35][36] There is evidence that having a pet can help a person lead a longer, healthier life. In a 1986 study of 92 people hospitalized for coronary ailments, within a year, 11 of the 29 patients without pets had died, compared to only 3 of the 52 patients who had pets.[29] Having pet(s) was shown to significantly reduce triglycerides, and thus heart disease risk, in the elderly.[37] A study by the National Institute of Health found that people who owned dogs were less likely to die as a result of a heart attack than those who did not own one.[38] There is some evidence that pets may have a therapeutic effect in dementia cases.[39] Other studies have shown that for the elderly, good health may be a requirement for having a pet, and not a result.[40] Dogs trained to be guide dogs can help people with vision impairment. Dogs trained in the field of Animal-Assisted Therapy (AAT) can also benefit people with other disabilities.[25][41]

Pets in long-term care institutions

People residing in a long-term care facility, such as a hospice or nursing home, may experience health benefits from pets. Pets help them to cope with the emotional issues related to their illness. They also offer physical contact with another living creature, something that is often missing in an elder's life.[11][42] Pets for nursing homes are chosen based on the size of the pet, the amount of care that the breed needs, and the population and size of the care institution.[29] Appropriate pets go through a screening process and, if it is a dog, additional training programs to become a therapy dog.[43] There are three types of therapy dogs: facility therapy dogs, animal-assisted therapy dogs, and therapeutic visitation dogs. The most common therapy dogs are therapeutic visitation dogs. These dogs are household pets whose handlers take time to visit hospitals, nursing homes, detention facilities, and rehabilitation facilities.[28] Different pets require varying amounts of attention and care; for example, cats may have lower maintenance requirements than dogs.[44]

Connection with community

In addition to providing health benefits for their owners, pets also impact the social lives of their owners and their connection to their community. There is some evidence that pets can facilitate social interaction.[45] Assistant Professor of Sociology at the University of Colorado at Boulder, Leslie Irvine has focused her attention on pets of the homeless population. Her studies of pet ownership among the homeless found that many modify their life activities for fear of losing their pets. Pet ownership prompts them to act responsibly, with many making a deliberate choice not to drink or use drugs, and to avoid contact with substance abusers or those involved in any criminal activity for fear of being separated from their pet. Additionally, many refuse to house in shelters if their pet is not allowed to stay with them.[46]

Health risks

Health risks that are associated with pets include:

  • Aggravation of allergies and asthma caused by dander and fur or feathers
  • Falling injuries. Tripping over pets, especially dogs causes more than 86,000 falls serious enough to prompt a trip to the emergency room each year in the United States.[47] Among elderly and disabled people, these falls have resulted in life-threatening injuries and broken bones.
  • Injury, mauling, and sometimes death caused by pet bites and attacks
  • Disease or parasites due to animal hygiene problems, lack of appropriate treatment, and undisciplined behavior (feces and urine)
  • Stress caused by the behavior of animals
  • Anxiety over who will care for the animal should the owner no longer be able to do so

Legalities

States, cities, and towns in Western nations commonly enact local ordinances to limit the number or kind of pets a person may keep personally or for business purposes. Prohibited pets may be specific to certain breeds (such as pit bulls or Rottweilers), they may apply to general categories of animals (such as livestock, exotic animals, wild animals, and canid or felid hybrids), or they may simply be based on the animal's size. Additional or different maintenance rules and regulations may also apply. Condominium associations and owners of rental properties also commonly limit or forbid tenants' keeping of pets.

The keeping of animals as pets can cause concerns with regard to animal rights and welfare.[48][49][50] Pets have commonly been considered private property, owned by individual persons. However, many legal protections have existed (historically and today) with the intention of safeguarding pets' (and other animals') well-being.[51][52][53][54] Since the year 2000, a small but increasing number of jurisdictions in North America have enacted laws redefining pet's owners as guardians. Intentions have been characterized as simply changing attitudes and perceptions (but not legal consequences) to working toward legal personhood for pets themselves. Some veterinarians and breeders have opposed these moves. The question of pets' legal status can arise with concern to purchase or adoption, custody, divorce, estate and inheritance, injury, damage, and veterinary malpractice.[55][56][57][58]

Environmental impact

Pets have a considerable environmental impact, especially in countries where they are common or held in high densities. For instance, the 163 million dogs and cats kept in the United States consume about 20% of the amount of dietary energy that humans do and an estimated 33% of the animal-derived energy.[59] They produce about 30% ± 13%, by mass, as much feces as Americans, and through their diet, constitute about 25–30% of the environmental impacts from animal production in terms of the use of land, water, fossil fuel, phosphate, and biocides. Dog and cat animal product consumption is responsible for the release of up to 64 ± 16 million tons CO2-equivalent methane and nitrous oxide, two powerful greenhouse gasses. Americans are the largest pet owners in the world, but pet ownership in the US has considerable environmental costs.[59]

Types

A young cow
The red fox was only recently domesticated

While many people have kept many different species of animals in captivity over the course of human history, only a relative few have been kept long enough to be considered domesticated. Other types of animals, notably monkeys, have never been domesticated but are still sold and kept as pets. There are also inanimate objects that have been kept as "pets", either as a form of a game or humorously (e.g. the Pet Rock or Chia Pet).Some wild animals are kept as pets, such as tigers, even though this is illegal. There is a market for illegal pets.

Domesticated

Domesticated pets are the most common types of pet. A domesticated animal is any animal that has been tamed and made fit for a human environment[60] by being consistently kept in captivity and selectively bred over a long enough period of time that it exhibits marked differences in behavior and appearance from its wild relatives.

Mammals

A rabbit
A hedgehog with albinism
A Labrador being petted
A Göttingen minipig

Birds

A chicken
An Oscar

Fish

Arthropods

Wild animals

The Hiran Minar near Lahore, Pakistan was built in the 17th century by the Mughal Emperor Jahangir as a funerary monument in honor of his pet deer.
The Pasha's Favourite Tiger, oil painting by Rudolph Ernst

Wild animals are kept as pets. The term “wild” in this context specifically applies to any species of animal which has not undergone a fundamental change in behavior to facilitate a close co-existence with humans. Some species listed here may have been bred in captivity for a considerable length of time, but are still not recognized as domesticated.

Generally, wild animals are recognized as not suitable to keep as pets, and this practice is completely banned in many places. In other areas, certain species are allowed to be kept, and it is usually required for the owner to obtain a permit. It is considered animal cruelty by some, as most often, wild animals require precise and constant care that is very difficult to meet in captive conditions. Many large and instinctively aggressive animals are extremely dangerous, and numerous times have they killed their handlers.

Exotic mammals

Birds

Reptiles

Amphibians

Fish

Invertebrates

The Caribbean hermit crab is one example of a pet arthropod.

History

Prehistory

Archaeology suggests that human ownership of dogs as pets may date back to at least 12,000 years ago.[61]

Ancient history

Ancient Greeks and Romans would openly grieve for the loss of a dog, evidenced by inscriptions left on tombstones commemorating their loss.[62] The surviving epitaphs dedicated to horses are more likely to reference a gratitude for the companionship that had come from war horses rather than race horses. The latter may have chiefly been commemorated as a way to further the owner's fame and glory.[63] In Ancient Egypt, dogs and baboons were kept as pets and buried with their owners. Dogs were given names, which is significant as Egyptians considered names to have magical properties. [64]

Victorian era: the rise of modern pet keeping

Throughout the seventeenth and eighteenth-century pet keeping in the modern sense gradually became accepted throughout Britain. Initially, aristocrats kept dogs for both companionship and hunting. Thus, pet keeping was a sign of elitism within society. By the nineteenth century, the rise of the middle class stimulated the development of pet keeping and it became inscribed within the bourgeois culture.[65]

Economy

As the popularity of pet-keeping in the modern sense rose during the Victorian era, animals became a fixture within urban culture as commodities and decorative objects.[66] Pet keeping generated a commercial opportunity for entrepreneurs. By the mid-nineteenth century, nearly twenty thousand street vendors in London dealt with live animals.[67] Also, the popularity of animals developed a demand for animal goods such as accessories and guides for pet keeping. Pet care developed into a big business by the end of the nineteenth century.[68]

Profiteers also sought out pet stealing as a means for economic gain. Utilizing the affection that owners had for their pets, professional dog stealers would capture animals and hold them for ransom.[69] The development of dog stealing reflects the increased value of pets. Pets gradually became defined as the property of their owners. Laws were created that punished offenders for their burglary.[70]

Social

Pets and animals also had social and cultural implications throughout the nineteenth century. The categorization of dogs by their breeds reflected the hierarchical, social order of the Victorian era. The pedigree of a dog represented the high status and lineage of their owners and reinforced social stratification.[71] Middle-class owners, however, valued the ability to associate with the upper-class through ownership of their pets. The ability to care for a pet signified respectability and the capability to be self-sufficient.[72] According to Harriet Ritvo, the identification of “elite animal and elite owner was not a confirmation of the owner’s status but a way of redefining it.”[73]

Entertainment

The popularity of dog and pet keeping generated animal fancy. Dog fanciers showed enthusiasm for owning pets, breeding dogs, and showing dogs in various shows. The first dog show took place on 28 June 1859 in Newcastle and focused mostly on sporting and hunting dogs.[74] However, pet owners produced an eagerness to demonstrate their pets as well as have an outlet to compete.[75] Thus, pet animals gradually were included within dog shows. The first large show, which would host one thousand entries, took place in Chelsea in 1863.[76] The Kennel Club was created in 1873 to ensure fairness and organization within dog shows. The development of the Stud Book by the Kennel Club defined policies, presented a national registry system of purebred dogs, and essentially institutionalized dog shows.[77]

Pet ownership by non-humans

Pet ownership by animals in the wild, as an analogue to the human phenomenon, has not been observed and is likely non-existent in nature.[78][79] One group of capuchin monkeys was observed appearing to care for a marmoset, a fellow New World monkey species, however observations of chimpanzees apparently "playing" with small animals like hyraxes have ended with the chimpanzees killing the animals and tossing the corpses around.[80]

A 2010 study states that human relationships with animals have an exclusive human cognitive component and that pet-keeping is a fundamental and ancient attribute of the human species. Anthropomorphism, or the projection of human feelings, thoughts and attributes on to animals, is a defining feature of human pet-keeping. The study identifies it as the same trait in evolution responsible for domestication and concern for animal welfare. It is estimated to have arose at least 100,000 years before present (ybp) in Homo sapiens sapiens.[79]

It is debated whether this redirection of human nurturing behaviour towards non-human animals, in the form of pet-keeping, was maladaptive, due to being biologically costly, or whether it was positively selected for.[81][82][79] Two studies suggest that the human ability to domesticate and keep pets came from the same fundamental evolutionary trait and that this trait provided a material benefit in the form of domestication that was sufficiently adaptive to be positively selected for.[79][82]:300 A 2011 study suggests that the practical functions that some pets provide, such as assisting hunting or removing pests, could've resulted in enough evolutionary advantage to allow for the persistence of this behaviour in humans and outweigh the economic burden held by pets kept as playthings for immediate emotional rewards.[83] Two other studies suggest that the behaviour constitutes an error, side effect or misapplication of the evolved mechanisms responsible for human empathy and theory of mind to cover non-human animals which has not sufficiently impacted its evolutionary advantage in the long run.[82]:300

Animals in captivity, with the help of caretakers, have been considered to have owned "pets". Examples of this include Koko the gorilla and several pet cats, Tonda the orangutan and a pet cat and Tarra the elephant and a dog named Bella.[80]

Pets in art

See also

References

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  2. 1 2 Leslie, Be; Meek, Ah; Kawash, Gf; Mckeown, Db (April 1994). "An epidemiological investigation of pet ownership in Ontario" (Free full text). The Canadian Veterinary Journal. 35 (4): 218–22. ISSN 0008-5286. PMC 1686751. PMID 8076276.
  3. "International Pet Relocation - NY International Shipping". Retrieved 16 January 2017.
  4. McRobbie, Linda Rodriguez (1 August 2017). "Should we stop keeping pets? Why more and more ethicists say yes". The Guardian. Retrieved 3 August 2017.
  5. Tang, Ailin; Bradsher, Keith (22 October 2018). "The Trade War's Latest Casualties: China's Coddled Cats and Dogs". New York Times. Retrieved 23 October 2018.
  6. "China Pet population and ownership 2019 update". China Pet Market. 25 December 2018. Retrieved 25 August 2019.
  7. "Main_Page45 milioni gli animali domestici in Italia: 150.000 ogni anno vengono abbandonati". Il Messaggero. 22 September 2009. Archived from the original on 11 July 2013.
  8. "UK domestic cat and dog population larger than thought". University of Bristol. 6 February 2010.
  9. "More cat owners 'have degrees' than dog-lovers". BBC News Online. 6 February 2010.
  10. "Facts + Statistics: Pet statistics | III". www.iii.org. Retrieved 25 August 2019.
  11. 1 2 http://www.shea-online.org/Portals/0/PDFs/Animals%20in%20Healthcare%20Facilities.pdf Archived 4 March 2016 at the Wayback Machine
  12. The Humane Society of the United States. "U.S. Pet Ownership Statistics". Retrieved 27 April 2012.
  13. "U.S. Pet Ownership & Demographics Sourcebook (2012)". Retrieved 16 January 2017.
  14. Daniel Halper (1 February 2013). "Animal Planet: Pets Outnumber Children 4 to 1 in America". The Weekly Standard. Retrieved 9 February 2013.
  15. Susan Hayes. "What are the most popular pets around the world?". PetQuestions.com. Archived from the original on 22 October 2010. Retrieved 4 March 2011.
  16. "Industry Statistics & Trends". American Pet Product Association. Retrieved 4 March 2011.
  17. "Plants and Your Cat". Cat Fanciers' Association. Archived from the original on 27 December 2009. Retrieved 15 May 2007.
  18. Langston, Cathy E. (1 January 2002). "Acute Renal Failure Caused by Lily Ingestion in Six Cats". Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association. 220 (1): 49–52, 36. doi:10.2460/javma.2002.220.49. PMID 12680447.
  19. "These plants can be poisonous to dogs". Sunset Magazine. Retrieved 17 October 2013.
  20. Klein, Dr Jerry; Dec 10, C. V. O.; Dec 10, 2018 | 2 Minutes; Minutes, 2018 | 2. "Are Poinsettias Poisonous to Dogs?". American Kennel Club. Retrieved 26 August 2019.
  21. "Overweight Dogs". Pet Care. The American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (ASPCA). Retrieved 17 October 2013.
  22. "Overweight Cats". Pet Care. The American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (ASPCA). Retrieved 17 October 2013.
  23. Zelman, Joanna (23 February 2011). "Pet Obesity: Over Half Of U.S. Dogs And Cats Are Overweight, Study Says". Huffington Post. Retrieved 17 October 2013.
  24. 1 2 "Pets are a kid's best friend, right? Maybe not, study says". Philadelphia Inquirer. Retrieved 27 December 2017.
  25. 1 2 3 4 "The Health Benefits of Pets". US Government National Institute of Health. Retrieved 25 December 2006.
  26. "Pets Are Good For Us—But Not In The Ways We Think They Are". National Geographic. 25 November 2017. Retrieved 27 December 2017.
  27. 1 2 "Largest-Ever Study of Pets and Kids' Health Finds No Link; Findings Dispute Widely Held Beliefs About Positive Effects of Pet Ownership". RAND. Retrieved 27 December 2017.
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Further reading

Pet Shop Boys

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pet_Shop_Boys
Pet Shop Boys are an English synth-pop duo, formed in London in 1981 and consisting of Neil Tennant and Chris Lowe.

PetSmart

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/PetSmart
PetSmart Inc. is an American retail chain operating in the United States, Puerto Rico, and Canada that is engaged in the sale of specialty pet animal products, such as food, furniture, habitats, and accessories, and services, such as dog grooming and dog training, boarding facilities, and daycare.

Pet Shop of Horrors

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pet_Shop_of_Horrors
Pet Shop of Horrors is a Japanese horror manga created by Matsuri Akino. The series focuses on the eccentric Count D, proprietor of a mysterious pet shop located in the heart of Chinatown, and the numerous patrons who visit his shop.

Pets.com

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pets.com
Pets.com was a dot-com enterprise headquartered in San Francisco that sold pet supplies to retail customers.

Pets Tseng

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pets_Tseng
Pets Tseng Pei-tzu (Chinese: 曾沛慈; born 21 October 1984) is a Taiwanese singer and actress.

PETSCII

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/PETSCII
PETSCII (PET Standard Code of Information Interchange), also known as CBM ASCII, is the character set used in Commodore Business Machines (CBM)'s 8-bit home computers, starting with the PET from 1977 and including the C16, C64, C116, C128[1], CBM-II, Plus/4, and VIC-20.

Pets of Imran Khan

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pets_of_Imran_Khan
Imran Khan, the Prime Minister of Pakistan, has owned five dogs at his residence in Bani Gala, Islamabad—Sheru, Sherni, Motu, Pidu and Maximus—of which the last three are still alive.

Petsamo–Kirkenes Offensive

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Petsamo%E2%80%93Kirkenes_Offensive
The Petsamo–Kirkenes Offensive was a major military offensive during World War II, mounted by the Red Army against the Wehrmacht in 1944 in northern Finland and Norway.

Pets at Home

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pets_at_Home
Pets at Home is the United Kingdom's largest pet supplies retailer, with more than 370 stores and 6,000 employees.

Pets of Vladimir Putin

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pets_of_Vladimir_Putin
Vladimir Putin, current president of Russia, owns four dogs, who live at his residence in Moscow. He is actively involved in the conservation of many endangered Russian dog breeds.

Pet sitting

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pet_sitting
Pet sitting is the act of temporarily taking care of another person's pet for a given time frame. It commonly occurs at the pet owner's home, but may also occur at the provider's home or at a pet sitting place of business or organization.

Pets Evacuation and Transportation Standards Act

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pets_Evacuation_and_Transportation_Standards_Act
The Pets Evacuation and Transportation Standards Act (PETS) was a bi-partisan initiative in the United States House of Representatives to require states seeking Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) assistance to accommodate pets and service animals in their plans for evacuating residents facing disasters.

Pets for Vets

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pets_for_Vets
Pets for Vets is a 501(c)(3) non-profit organization in the United States dedicated to providing a second chance to shelter dogs by rescuing, training, and matching them with American veterans who need a companion pet.

Pets (song)

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pets_(song)
"Pets" is a song by alternative rock band Porno for Pyros and the second single from their 1993 self-titled album Porno for Pyros.

PetSmart Charities

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/PetSmart_Charities
PetSmart Charities and PetSmart Charities of Canada are non-profit organizations dedicated to saving the lives of homeless pets.

Pets or Meat: The Return to Flint

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pets_or_Meat:_The_Return_to_Flint
Pets or Meat: The Return to Flint is a 1992 American short PBS documentary film written, co-produced and directed by Michael Moore, featuring the director returning to his hometown of Flint, Michigan, to catch-up with some of the characters featured in his previous film Roger & Me (1989).

Pets (TV series)

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pets_(TV_series)
Pets is an adult British puppet sitcom, produced by Fit2Fill Productions Limited. It was originally aired on Channel 4 and ran for two series, the first being broadcast in 2001, and the second in 2002. It was also sold to Fox in Australia, MTV in Italy, and the Middle East.The series was created and written by Andrew Barclay and Brian West (pen name Brian Luff), who had previously worked together at the Edinburgh Festival, winning an award for an advert for The Jerry Springer Show, and on the sketch show We Know Where You Live.

PetSynth

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/PetSynth
PetSynth is an open-source music software for the Commodore PET computer, created in 2007 by Chiron Bramberger.

Pets Corner

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pets_Corner
Pets Corner UK Ltd is a United Kingdom-based ethical pet care retail store chain. Its main area of business is selling specialist natural pet foods, accessories and treatments predominantly for dogs and cats, but also for small animals, reptiles, birds, wildlife, and tropical and cold water fish.

Pets 101

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pets_101
Pets 101 is a show that airs on Animal Planet.

Petseri County

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Petseri_County
Petseri County (Estonian: Petserimaa) was a county of Estonia established in 1918. Since 1944, however, most of the county has been administered as Pechorsky District of Pskov Oblast, first by the Russian SFSR and then, from 1991, by Russia.

PETS

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/PETS
PETS or Pets may refer to:

Petschek Villa

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Petschek_Villa
The Petschek Villa is a palatial home built by Otto Petschek in the early 1920s in Prague. Since 1945 it has been the residence of the United States Ambassadors first to Czechoslovakia, and subsequently, to the Czech Republic.

Pets de sœurs

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pets_de_s%C5%93urs
Pets de sœur (English: (religious) sister's farts), sometimes euphemistically translated as nun's pastries or brown sugar rolls, are French-Canadian pastries filled with butter and brown sugar which are rolled, sliced and then baked.

Petsamo Province

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Petsamo_Province
The Province of Petsamo (Finnish: Petsamon lääni, Swedish: Petsamo län) was a province of Finland from 1921 to 1922.

Pet Pals

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pet_Pals
Pet Pals (Italian: Cuccioli) is an Italian animated television series. It was created by Sergio Manfio while the Disney cartoonist Giorgio Cavazzano served as art director.

Pets from Harry Potter

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pets_from_Harry_Potter

Pets Win Prizes

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pets_Win_Prizes
Pets Win Prizes was a game show, produced by the British Broadcasting Corporation and shown on Saturday nights on BBC 1 in the United Kingdom from 16 July 1994 to 3 August 1996. It was originally hosted by Danny Baker, but Dale Winton became the host at the start of the second series.

PetScan

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/PetScan

PetsOvernight.com

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/PetsOvernight.com

Petsch Moser

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Petsch_Moser
Petsch Moser is an indie rock band from Vienna, Austria.

Petscop

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Petscop

PETSCII art

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/PETSCII_art

Petsamo expeditions

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Petsamo_expeditions
The Petsamo expeditions (Finnish: Petsamon retket, Swedish: Petsamoexpeditionerna) were two military expeditions in May 1918 and in April 1920 by Finnish civilian volunteers, to annex Petsamo (Russian: Pechanga) from Bolshevist Russia.

Pets and work animals as a food source

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pets_and_work_animals_as_a_food_source

Petseling Monastery

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Petseling_Monastery
Padtselling Monastery (Tibetan: པད་ཚལ་གླིང, THL: Padtselling) is a gompa in the dzong style of Bhutan built near Jakar, Bumthang District in 1769 with support from the Penlop of Trongsa and the dzongpen (governor) of Jakar.

Pets of presidents

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pets_of_presidents

Pets.tv

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pets.tv

Petsoe End

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Petsoe_End
Petsoe End is a hamlet in Emberton, which is in the Borough of Milton Keynes, in the ceremonial county of Buckinghamshire, England.

Pets vs Orcs

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pets_vs_Orcs

Pets dragon

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pets_dragon

Petschek Palace

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Petschek_Palace
The Petschek Palace (in Czech Petschkův palác or Pečkárna) is a neoclassicist building in Prague. It was built between 1923 and 1929 by the architect Max Spielmann upon a request from the merchant banker Julius Petschek and was originally called "The Bank House Petschek and Co." (Bankhaus Petschek & Co.) Despite its historicizing look, the building was then a very modern one, being constructed of reinforced concrete and fully air-conditioned.

Petsimpallas

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Petsimpallas

Pets (The Batman)

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pets_(The_Batman)

Pets with degrees

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pets_with_degrees

Petsburgh USA

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Petsburgh_USA
Petsburgh USA was an American television program about pets, that premiered in 1998. It was hosted by Brianne Leary and was filmed at a soundstage in the Disney-MGM Studios at the Walt Disney World Resort in Lake Buena Vista, FL.

Petsay

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Petsay

Pet shop

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pet_shop
A pet shop or pet store is a retail business which sells different kinds of animals. Pet stores also sell pet food, supplies, and accessories.

Petsuchos

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Petsuchos